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CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 5:00am EDT
are told this is the other suppression. we're told this is a return to the jim crow laws. well, frankly 80 percent of americans support the total idea pools. the thomas is a high percentage for any issue, even high and another that your humble pie because people are estranged and some people. chieftains of hispanics and african-americans support photo id. in fact, rasmussen asked, they believe and for a is a serious issue? 63 percent of whites said yes and 64 percent of african-americans said gm's. african americans in some places live where a machine controls the political left that the live under. frankly it allows the crime rates to skyrocket. the biggest victim of flow from is minority reformers and veterinarians were political machines control the destiny in the can't fight city of. the mayor of detroit who until recently was serving in public housing after conviction for crimes, he won his second term in part because of a flood of fraudulent ballots. the city clerk cluster job after that. abilene were asking for another florist, a town we could extend free finlandia's to
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 1:45pm EDT
. >> the libertarian party is often associated with changing the drug laws and you've advocated for that as well. >> changing the? >> drug laws. the >> has come since 1989 of advocated legalizing marijuana, controller cannot regulate, tax it. we had a tipping point with regard to marijuana and legalizing it. i think that colorado is going to do that. it's on the ballot in colorado this november, regulate marijuana like alcohol. i think it is going to pass. when it passes and if it doesn't pass the colorado come is going to pass the 50% of americans now say they support the motion. it is a growing number. it's a growing number because people are talking about the issue more than they ever have before, recognizing 90% of the drug problem is prohibition repeated, not use related. that is not to discount the problems of use and abuse, but that should be the focus. i think when we legalize marijuana were going to take giant steps forward regarding all other drugs and that is going to be starting with looking at the drug issue first as a health issue rather than a criminal justice issue. >> let's
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 7:45pm EDT
product of harvard law school and three products at yale on the supreme court. there are apparently no other law schools in the united states besides those two. it is a bizarre and unfortunate fact i think actually. but those are i hope interesting facts about the supreme court. but frankly i don't think that they are very important. here is an important fact about the supreme court. there are five republicans and four democrats. i will speak for somewhat longer. but this is basically all you need to know. if there is a takeaway i've gotten to the point earlier there are five republicans and four democrats and that tells you much of what you need to know. it is true the justices where the roads because they are supposed to look alike and it's supposed to give the perception that they are all pretty much the same. but just as the united states congress is a deeply divided according to the party, so is the united states supreme court, and this is a moment of partisan division at the supreme court, and of that is exemplified in case after case. why this is of important you need to go back
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 9:00pm EDT
life after he leaves milwaukee and goes to stanford law school is becoming a clerk to supreme court justice robert jackson. tell us a little bit about how that came about, because i want to lead into what you unfold in here having to do with some of his conservativism on blacks and whites. >> guest: right, right. jackson was a, was, i think, seen by then even as a great justice. >> host: uh-huh. >> guest: and he had been the prosecutor at the nuremberg war trials. he'd actually taken time off from the court and gone to nuremberg and been the chief prosecutor and then come back to the court. and so rehnquist graduates from the stanford law school early at the end of 1952. he was, actually, in the class that would have graduated a semester later, but rehnquist finished his work. he was so smart -- >> host: yeah. >> guest: -- he got out early. so he wanted to, he -- it was clear when i was researching through his papers and looking at the diaries that he had actually, that were on deposit with his papers, which were fascinating. he had six notebooks that were filled with his reminiscen
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 11:00am EDT
issuing presidential signing statements, which i thought he was saying he did not have to obey the law, but what happened was, there was a legitimate, strong argument being made by the president's supporters in favor of why the president had the use statements to distance himself from legislation. there were also very strong arguments by people like me who says that that is unconstitutional. the american bar association appointed a task force to look into these findings and i was a member of that task force, and then the president of the aba and i testified before a house committee and, guess what? even though a good face was being made for the president to issue and sign the statements, not one single democrat, not one saw any merit in his argument. even though i thought and a lot of other people thought that what the president was doing was clearly unconstitutional, the president saying i don't have to obey the law that i just time, not one republican done anything wrong with it. on issue after issue, foreign policy or anything else, we divide into these parties. first of all, there
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2012 12:00pm EDT
my students in constitutional law, this country is a work in progress. sometimes the government's going to go too far, and we need to rein them in. i'm not in favor of excessive government involvement in my life. um, and sometimes private industry will go too far in terms of wanting to make it all about how much profit they make, and we'll rein them in because health care is not something that should be guided solely by the bottom line. so i think the government has a role, and i think we have to keep a catch -- watchdog, citizens' deal on how much of a role we give them. >> i would add to that that birth control access should be a nonpartisan issue. as many of you probably know, president nixon signed title x family planning funding into law. it was a republican value for lesser government intrusion in our lives and good fiscal conservativism. $1 invested saves $4 in unnecessary costs. and as we know today, social ideology is forcing some of our politicians to be more socially conservative than fiscally responsible. because they recognize this is just good public health. >> okay.
CSPAN
Oct 4, 2012 8:00pm EDT
combating autism into law, critical for those families. iran is a national security threat to the united states and allies in israel. i joined at the republican senator from illinois was passed in most crippling sanctions by one company against another and got a 100 [cheers and applause] zero vote in the united states senate, something you don't see too often. working with republican senator, chair of the housing subcommittee, we pass into law doubling housing. those are three of many examples i can. for i have worked with republican senators on the other site to make a difference for new jersey families. talking about bipartisan all-time, 90% of these those durand line with his party in the state legislature. every time his colleagues want to seek an override, he has never found once an opportunity to join them and say no. >> moderator: michael aron at the next question to senator menendez. >> senator menendez can the team to snipe at each other all the time. you seem to have a chilly relationship with governor christie dating back to 2006 when you were the target of an investiga
CSPAN
Oct 5, 2012 11:00pm EDT
people in legal law firm conference rom, they could get an internet connection. people in starbucks where they could get an internet connection. people working at the kitchen tables around town. and all of a sudden, right around april 1st. bestart moving to the headquarter. this is literally six week aways from the announcement. and this just this big space. bigger than the room. far bigger than the room. three or four times of the size of the room. it was a whole floor of the high-rise building in chicago, and it was just kind of remarkable. we didn't have everybody in. we were slowly bringing people in. literally we were still getting the servers up. we had telephones ringing and people try to answer phone calls. we had e-mail coming in to our e-mail address. we didn't have a system to receive e nail a real way that you would want. we had many coming many. we didn't have budgets. and we had, you know, we had constituency leaders calling our political department because they wanted to have time with the candidate, we had our fundraisers, who had to raise money with the little known
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 7:00pm EDT
job. the brennan center at nyu school of law has been thorough investigation at the idea of voter fraud. they say basically it doesn't exist. there've been 10 or 12 cases in the first 10 years of this century out of hundreds of millions of those spirits someone may register as mickey mouse, but mickey mouse never shows up in rows. but nevertheless, rove has initiated a cam pain and its allies in more than 30 states legislature of having votes requiring voter ids. now part of the democrats are saying this is a severe form of voter suppression. that is in many cases you find the elderly was given up their drivers licenses, but it's perfect years, the out they no longer have a government issued i.d., so they are not allowed to vote. you have minorities that is hispanic. one of the challenge is hispanic timebomb. now there'll be 70 million in 2020. if they start to vote on that, it's going to be curtains for the republican speakers 10 million hispanics in texas alone. states like texas and arizona will flip from red to blue very soon, when sakic said. so this is one thing they're tryi
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 12:30am EDT
important in the story is just an law so i thought it was time somebody brought that story to light. >> we are the maine state library in a public reading room and were going the maine author's collection. in the early 1920s, henry tunick who is the state laboring at the time started collecting books by maine writers trying to get them signed whenever possible and it has grown into this. >> welcome to maine's capital city on booktv. with the help of our time warner cable partners or the next 90 minutes we will explore the literary culture of this area as we visit with local authors and explore special collections that help tell the history of not only this state but the country as well. >> this is the first parish church in brunswick maine and it's significant to the story of uncle tom's cabin. in many plays places stories began here. it is here in this pew, pew number 23 that harriet beecher stowe by her account saw a vision of uncle tom dean clips to death. now uncle tom, as you probably know, is the title, the hero of her 1852 novel, uncle tom's cabin and the story of uncle tom's
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 12:00pm EDT
of what the laws of the state or the country said at the time. she came to brunswick because her husband got a job at bowdoin college. he stayed in ohio and and later moved to andover, in order to complete his contract there is a professor. she came without him with their children, and she was also six months pregnant. and she moved to brunswick in order to take up residency here, awaiting the arrival of her husband. the stories that were told of harriet beecher stowe is that she was a small and petite woman. she did not take much care in terms of how she dressed. but she was also very numerous for a woman of her time. she was known then mostly as a housewife. she wrote that she was totally overwhelmed with the number of children -- she had seven and she was pregnant -- that is what you would see as an overworked housewife and mother who came to worship here, probably with her children and her sisters, catherine beecher, and they all became members of this church. we first meet uncle tom in his hut. he is in a slave huts. he is learning to read the bible. the bible is an inner te
CSPAN
Oct 5, 2012 7:00pm EDT
questions that we have. sir? hi. i'm with the public international law policy group. thank you for being here. my question is in regard to the local government formally -- certain parts of syria back. how do you facility economic and social policy between the two so that once assad is finally toppled that the transition to a new unified syria is easier? >> so with the emergence of the local counsels, they have established their own governance structures, they have committed to working in collaboration with whatever transitional government does emerge. we are securing agreements from the community as they develop as they empower themselves. so i think there's a very positive outlook and the fact they took the initiative to do this the fact they are getting international support and facer various forms i think indicates they're moving toward post assad more cohe'sive formula. >> can i just add and say that as there are a number of groups that now associated with the administration counsel these include groups that have freely formed, i'd like to name one which is a group of -- it's c
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2012 11:00pm EDT
differently. i'm going to respect international law. we probably violated the sovereignty with drones and covert action than we did under brush and there's a whole new set of questions there. i could -- the list could go on it seems like we have problems with the institution and we have problems with our ability to lead within the institution. i was wondering what your reaction to one or both of the issues. one is a generally statement. i agree with the ideas to win. you know, the power the soviet unions were strong. when the soviet union was strong and the idea of liberal internationalism will be strong as we can prove by example. the world of social networking which is the em emulation is hugely a powerful force in the world. .. and the whole number of rather meaningful things are done. the international criminal court . the key of the treaty. the land that -- antipersonnel landmines ban, small arms agreement. all of them were done with the u.s. voting exam. and the votes were like 178 to one and one pattern 46 with 18. those kinds of votes. in the u.s. was the only democracy with t
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 4:00pm EDT
comet that would seem to be the law of the jungle is aware, are categorically different as well. we can certainly see this radical dehumanization inerrant history. black slaves are not only that they are, but were fundamentally different than their white slave owners. never remaining wholly in the realm of either philosophy or psychology, but i was training samples from her experience in the world, smith argues that they want to overcome our tendons used to dehumanize, which lead to atrocities and genocide, we must look these tendencies square in the face. we must study down honestly, openly, in order to control them. "less than human" has garnered lavish praise from scholars. in the evolutionary psychology, looks like smith should be required reading for all with a social conscience. his ideas that define their way into every school curriculum. the psychologist paul bloom calls it a beautiful book on an ugly topic. charles w. mills, dean of moral philosophy calls it, and i quote, a powerful and original work that forces us to recognize the monstrous atrocities are routinely carried out
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 2:00pm EDT
agrees now of the right is because of a law for the greece, under greek law, whatever party comes in first, i will take a step back. it has proportional representation. that the reserves a rule of comment. you should have the same percentage of delegates in congress that write the law. 18% of the people while party a, and it will come to deciding what laws get passed. they will effectively screwed that in which you would think of the idea. in european countries, we have torsional representation. you get a cut off of 5%. that is how many seats that you get. if you get 51% of the vote, you get it all and the 49% worked. by the way, we have had proportional representation in the united states in the past, and even have it now. when you read about a primary and the vote in some states, and candidate a gets another delegate conventions, that is a proportional representation and they get an equal number of delegates than what they got out of the vote. we actually recognize in the united states proportional representation, we just don't allow these days. one of the reasons for that, if i ca
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 5:00pm EDT
this. not all of them, but found that i have heard speak because politics has changed the law in the last even 30 years, where now the media and people who are running everything is so polarized and i feel like another kind of that divide also created is a lot of people like if you're into business, you're dramatically like a republican or something like that. or if you are not into business, then you're just completely to the other side. i feel that you shouldn't have to be like that. if you want to start your own business, you can be a democrat, whatever. there's just a lot of unneeded social pressure in that aspect. >> god bless the american businessman. i am for the henry ford who at their own money built up a producing company and by the way doubled the pay of the workers because it occurred to him, hey, maybe it's my own workers can afford to buy the product they make, i will make my products. a lot of people laugh over engine charlie wilson who is the secretary of defense under eisenhower. they always mangled the quote. they say what is good for general motors is good for amer
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2012 8:00pm EDT
"washington journal" tomorrow morning, we'll examine the health care law that presidential candidate mitt romney signed into law when he was governor of massachusetts. our guest is boston herald reporter christine mcconnell. we'll be joined by howard kertz and lauren ashburn of the daily download to look at the use of social media in the presidential campaign. and we'll discuss the college board's recent report on how high school students are doing on the s.a.t.s. our guest is college board vice president james montoya. washington journal journal is live on c-span every day at 7 a.m. eastern. >>> tuesday the new america foundation looks at the role of money in the 2012 elections. panelists include former sec chairman trevor potter. live coverage starting at 12:15 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> every generation through our history has worked and sacrificed to leave a better country to their children, their grandchildren and future generations. we're spending their money, we are now even more, much more spending their money, and we are leaving them a mess that will be a very difficult to deal w
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 10:00pm EDT
stronger steps to rid us of the media of testing. ever since no trial left behind was enacted into law is a national psychosis. not just bad pedagogy but something psychotic. my father was a psychiatrist and used to take me to the back toward the of the mental hospital in massachusetts. some of the people in the most severe depression, the only way to ease discomfort was it to number everything. restlessly a moving objects around to get them in the right pattern dead number them. i don't know. i think some of the bureaucrats who gave us this law maybe they would enjoy this day in a recovery house to get over the numerical addiction. judging teachers and children primarily on the basis of a very narrow slice of mechanistic skills to be measured simplistically by standardized exam and ruling out the consequence, ruling out to the rich forms of culture like reading books for pleasure. what other reason is there to read a book and the way? but pleasure is not tested. no points for pleasure. asking koppel questions? indulging curiosity? developing real critical capacity so when they grow up ca
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 8:00am EDT
harvard and law degree from the university of chicago. eliza krigman of "politico," next question. >> yes, a very impressive background for this position. since you have worked as verizon communications, have you been lobbied by any of the people that you used to work with? >> guest: i have not, no. >> okay. on that same topic, i'd like to ask is the fcc supposed to operate in the public interest, but the reality of the matter is most of the people who comment on the public record are the well-heeled lobbyists, and that's who the commission also spends a lot of time meeting with. what are you going to do personally to make sure your opinion's informed by the average consumer? >> guest: at my confirmation hearing in november of last year, i stated i would hold no favor for or prejudice against any particular company, person or segment of the industry. and i would like to think that in the four-and-a-half months that i've had the privilege of serving at the fcc that i've stayed true to that. i've taken literally hundreds of meetings, some of them have been with representatives of di
CSPAN
Oct 3, 2012 12:00pm EDT
enumerated, but also because the world has changed around us. in part because the laws our policy. we spent an awful lot of time, effort and money after world war ii creating an international system, economic system in particular to stimulate the growth in the rest of the world. so, this is the success of the policy of several decades that has made us relatively less strong in terms of disposable cash and disposable incentives to get to the behavior that we want to see. militarily, we surely are as strong as we have ever been, but we live in a world that has a number of nuclear powers and we still live in the world before 1957 that had not. so, other than us. you know, to me it hardly even seems worth debating this is a different world. >> i was told we have to debate. [inaudible] the decline is the wrong word. i think the world is getting more crowded. they are growing faster and in economic terms the u.s. will have the west shared wealth for the years ahead but there isn't a country by the way that is as jessica said that is a story of american success. it's for 60 years of promoted
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 12:00pm EDT
thank you to the experience. his entire place is that the law professors like turn, the committee table in the illinois statehouse during various meetings, but he's never the guy in the front of the room deciding, making the hard calls. he is various little management experience, suddenly he's in the most managerial job in the world. president of the united states, these are the free world is my question was how does he do it? odyssey make decisions? how does a cover? that's interesting too, but what is his leadership style? when i looked around for books about to dismiss the serious and sustained weight. >> you see this as a campaign document coming up close to the november election? >> guest: well, publishers do like the time for it when attention. most americans tune into politics around election time. that is more or less a happy accident. >> host: one of the things that surprised me and the surprise a lot of the leaders is all of your sources are democrats. this is a very critical study, get all of your sources were democrats. >> guest: some of the sources i don't know the politics
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 5:45am EDT
, there is no rule of law, and perceived political infractions are met with harsh punishment. punishment that it needed out to three generations of person's family. a political offender knows that with he goes to prison, his parents and his children will probably go with him. there are probably about 200,000 north koreans today, and more than a million perhaps as high as 2 million have already died there. the reason we know all of this is and much, much more is thanks to the testimonies of north koreans who have escaped. these are the people i write about in my book. this knowledge comes to us despite the best effort of the kim family regime to keep it secret. for more than fifty years, ever since the end of the korean war, they have within saled off from the world's eyes. the kim family regime pursued an eyelationist policy and mains an iron grip on information. access to which is very strictly controlled. to give just one example, every radio must be registered with the government. and it's dial must be fixed to the government run radio station. to enforce this rule, securi
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 10:00am EDT
been in the other financial institutions and the answer is that there is no law that they could hang them on. they could find nothing illegal and it wasn't for the want of trying and that's why we've still not seen the high level executives go to jail and why they are trying to push forward all of this nonsense financial reform the haven't been able to do. >> i don't know if it was for want of trying. >> you have the attorney general and the banks to own the place as upset about the senate. there wasn't an urge to prosecute. there were three questions i just want to be fair to affairs if you could change any part of the book, what would it be? >> that's a good question. i wonder if they mean if i would have written something or if the book history could have been different. >> if i would have written something differently that is an interesting question. i would like to have actually talked to kerry killinger, so that would have changed. i could have spent the entire book talking about the last month because there were so many politics and the decision appeared. >> has anyone been fa
CSPAN
Oct 3, 2012 9:00am EDT
-- not the campaign finance law by the textile of what 501(c)(4)'s were supposed to be. spent i think it really is complicated. i had an interviewer reporting to me how i start talking a 501(c)(4) in the start menu set my personal goal is never to mention the phrase 501(c)(4) in my article. that's why stephen colbert was so good. he could managed to distill all this in the four minutes and try to explain why you should care. [inaudible] >> stephen colbert -- [inaudible] thank you for coming, and come up and asked for follow-up questions later on. [applause] >> leading up to tonight's presidential debate, a panel of experts now with some of the leadership styles of president obama and republican presidential nominee made wrong. former presidential hopeful and utah governor jon huntsman, congressman bart gordon, and weekly standard editor william kristol among the speakers at this event, life here at the brookings institution. it is just getting under way. >> leadership style and approach to management. so the questions we will be looking at today is how does the total presidential camp
CSPAN
Oct 2, 2012 5:00pm EDT
abet a fugitive slave, they themselves would be imprisoned or fined for breaking the law. it was seen as a compromise from the north to avoid war. so that was part of what the novel was trying to do, was to say listen, i am a person, harriet beecher stowe, as was most of new england. i am a slave to find spammers herself and her border. we have a right to do that. we are not delayed. >> house has done better than the senate or the obama administration making its proceedings more transparent to the public online. that is according to participants of a semi-foundation for an in washington d.c. the group also discussed the fact that lawmakers not only read the legislation of full before voting on it. this is 90 minutes. >> welcome. my name is daniel schuman, director of the advising committee and transparency. today's discussion is going to focus on whether congress is serious about transparency. we are going to beat the one 112 congress and also identify some of the deficits. we are going to do my speaking portion very quickly because it's really interesting is of course a panelist on t
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2012 5:00pm EDT
laws or other laws are more supportive of the needs of their businesses and deliver product to market. so with that, then we are looking at another set of tensions. we are expecting the global supply chain to be available at all times. to enable from an ict perspective our confidentiality of the businesses and then we're demanding those products maintain their integrity. it's no mistake that i'm using the confidencialty integrity and available of information assurance, that's in many ways we're talking about the three tenants of information assurance we're not worried about the integrity of the products coming in to the global supply chain that might comprise the businesses or confidentiality so software behind the actual stuff. the products are being built, delivered maintains, upgraded all around the world and they are vulnerable to opponents who wish it harm. to manipulate the product through the design through the life cycle. and adversaries that may have access to those particular networks or designed to have accessn'ting access to whatever part of the target is target-ric
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 9:00pm EDT
. look what happened. hamas has closed opinions about many issues like sharia law, is real, united states, they could walk together to find a way. i do not want to an ex the baidu think they should be connected to jordan and egypt. it cannot happen tomorrow. we will have to wait. two years ago we would have told to the president would be caged in jail in cairo you would think i am in st.. today tell you the long term should be the linkage between the palestinians and jordan and those in the gaza with egypt. things change repast we have to put forward what we think is best. >> i see that as dangerous and there is also a moral issue. thank you will. >> i was in jerusalem 1973 when the war broke out as 71 not send weapons to the middle east because we do not want to encourage the war that has just guarded which sounded noble but at the same time they were sending weapons to the syrians and egyptians. my concern is with the fiery and gets the atomic bomb unquestioned is not that the egyptians will say we want the same toy but the point* is the egyptians or suni this garcetti arabia are
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 8:00pm EDT
people fought that as the historian john law points out, left out of this account were competing narratives and i'm quoting, one of those narratives was a story of slavery, emancipation and freedom unquote. his mandate is long to put that narrative back into the official account of the civil war. in his other works since that book including beyond the battlefield race in the civil war passages to freedom the underground railroad and history and memory and they slave no more, two men who escaped to freedom including their narratives of emancipation. and countless articles, essays and lectures david blight has returned this theme of memory and commemoration and what it means to conflate the subjective accounts with fact and history and not to recognize them as subjective at all. now he comes to us with that -- "american oracle' the civil war in the civil rights era which brings this new ones exploration into the 20th century. as we approach this as quick -- sesquicentennial blight brings to light for american writers with their own perspectives to bear on the centennial of the civi
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 1:30pm EDT
materials from his office in the law firm in new york city, and it's still getting awards and generating material for his career and so they come to rest over time. in 1990 having just been elected the senate majority leader, mitchell was involved in the 1990 amendments to the act and this is a letter from george h. w. bush thanking him for his collaboration and succeeding in getting that legislation passed. the 1990 amendment was important for us today. we paid $4 a gallon for gas in the sense that it was the amendment that discussed the composition of gas and the introduction of chemicals during certain seasons of the year in order to make for cleaner air. in a sample of his writing style. there are researchers to come because they're interested in particular topics but there's also people that come because the interested in particular techniques or approaches. some people are interested in the newspapers because of the negotiation for instance. and so this is a research question that bridges a variety of the records that we have and others are interested in his rhetoric. ho
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 3:00pm EDT
into law is the kind of national psychosis, but there's something psychotic about it. it can't be numbered. it doesn't count. my father's psychiatrist use to take me to the back boards of mental hospitals in massachusetts and so many people on the most severe depression the only way they could ease their discomfort is by numbering everything. they would restlessly move object surrounded the table to get them in the pattern, and as i mentioned, some of the bureaucrats in washington maybe they would enjoy este in the recovery house to get over this numerical what action. this hoping of judging children and their teachers primarily on the basis of that very narrow slice of purely mechanistic skills that can be measured more simplistically by standardized exam and ruling out as a consequence ruling out all of those more authentic forms of culture that are not reduced to numbers like reading books for pleasure. it's the only reason i read a book. you get no points for pleasure or asking thoughtful questions or indulging curiosity, developing real critical capacity so when they grow wha
CSPAN
Oct 3, 2012 11:00pm EDT
$20 million. $40 million help. >> people don't realize that because of the new campaign finance laws, if you get sheldon adelson say that was such a good performance i will drop another $40 million into your campaign which they can do? >> sheldon adelson got in the hall. got to see it first-hand. >> could have cut the check on the spot. it is possible. we did a recently a very good piece on sheldon. you interviewed him. extraordinary amount of money can put into campaign. >> four times the previous record. most previous individual given, george soros $24 million in 2004 against george w. bush. >> he wasn't done yet. that is what i took away from your story. >> no, absolutely. >> if it will make a difference he will get. >> we've been able to study the obama campaign, the operation for, you know, five, five 1/2 years sort of in campaign mode and governing mode. how do they react to moment like this? they obviously don't panic but they do what? how do they take a bad thing and neutralize it and ultimately a good thing. how? >> the president has an expression. talks about our time in th
CSPAN
Oct 4, 2012 5:00pm EDT
suffer with ptsd specifically due to military specific trauma. when the law was reduced, the standards reduced for men with ptsd they left out military sexual trauma. they fail to reduce the standards and women largely impart women, providing the burden of proof for women grouping claims for the military. we want to be included in that for ptsd. so what they told us is that we want fair treatment. we want the va to understand that women are large part of our military and when we come home we want to be cared for just like our male veterans. >> very good, thank you very much. [applause] [applause] >> senator boatman. >> thank you mr. chairman. i really don't have anymore questions. i appreciate your comments and especially coming from somebody that can relay their personal experiences very important and i appreciate you sharing your particular ordeal and that is certainly something. i know that the committee on both sides are going to be working hard to try and remedy that there is simply no excuse for that so thank you commander for being here and we just appreciate your serv
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 3:45pm EDT
about their legal rights and i am sure there are some law students in the room. when you read the book and the legal documents about the declaration, you understand about legal advice and international, finding, legal rights to jews and the rights to the land. i call this the common sense rights. [inaudible] this side was aggressive and started the war in and saying, you know, above my land back, -- even in the united states, nobody comes and tells you that we want our land back after we lost the war. the common sense rights should be something that should be said straightly. it enables us to espouse another role. [inaudible] if you lose, you lose. i've been talking about the rights about something very important, many times because of the pressure, coming from washington and the u.s., we tend not to speak about what belongs to us and what we believe, and i chose the name of the book "isreal: the will to prevail" because i think it is all about us. if we have the will to live, the will and the courage of the nation, we would be able to prevail. if we would try to satisfy everybody
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 8:00pm EDT
make about the same. the first year associates and law firms make about the same but women on average choose to work fewer hours than men. even when they work full time because you know full time is anything above 35 hours a week. women work about 12% fewer hours. about 25% of women work part-time. many women go in and out of the workforce if they have children and that on average is their average earnings but it doesn't mean they are discriminated against. it doesn't mean that if you take two women into men in the same job they don't earn the same. they do. >> what is the paycheck fairness act and do you think it's necessary? >> the paycheck fairness act just was up again for a vote in congress. it failed. is also failed when there is a demographic -- democratic house, and senate. that is because it would require them to report to the government that women they have on their payroll, the men they have on their payroll and how much they paid those groups and that attempted to equalize pay between groups of women in groups of men rather than as both wall holds right now men and women i
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 7:00pm EDT
for originalism in constitutional law. well, i'm here to say something about the argument of this book, which as you can have heard is called "i am the change." and the title is meant to bring out president obama's louis the xiv side. louis the xiv said -- i am the state. and mr. obama became very close in an press conference to saying i am the change. the title is actually from suggestion of my editor. and publishers, i had entertained another possibility, which was actually suggested to me my my friend bill. barack obama, what the hell were we thinking? [laughter] as opposed to some of my conservative colleagues and friends, i don't think we get very far by labeling president obama a socialist or by trying to trace his foreign origins or his secret muslim "devotions" nor i do think even that we greatly alumni nate things by to -- as my old friend argues in his movie and two books about obama. i think it's fairer to begin fairer and more useful in the end -- excuse me. to begin admitting president obama is what he call himself namely a progressive or a liberal. and the rest of th
CSPAN
Oct 5, 2012 12:00pm EDT
of law to ensure the system if we suffer injury in the physical sense or through fraud. the government can't keep us safe and it's so limited they should not be telling me that i have to buy health insurance or i will get taxed more. what should the role of government be in your life we are asking you in this morning's journal. it states in the constitution of the federal government is to do. 18 enumerations, the rest are reserved for the state's and the people. next call, jeff in texas. good morning to you, sir. >> caller: that would be kevin in washington. >> host: good morning. you are on the air. go ahead. >> caller: i believe that if the proper role of the federal government is to protect individual liberties we are supposed to have rules against that, against fraud, against the injured. but the problem is the federal government has gone way beyond that. it seems like they want to redistribute what people have gained through their liberties and freedoms and once you do that, you are violating people's liberties. i think that they have gone too far. they're telling us wh
CSPAN
Oct 3, 2012 7:00am EDT
also pleased to have this opportunity to talk to someone or some public health, law enforcement, industry and government about this pressing and really important public health challenge. and i want to offer an update on the progress that would make sense unless lesser which already was two years ago, which i don't know where the time goes. but we have been busy and have improved our strategies and our engagement to address the increasingly complex supply chain that we now regulate. then i want to tell you about be safe rx, know your online pharmacy which is our new national campaign that you've heard a little bit about, and it's designed to educate consumers who purchase medications over the internet. president kennedy like to say we must think and act not only for the moment but for our time. and the 21st century is really our time. and as i've also suggested and we are seeking to address a serious and far-reaching problem. one that sadly is growing, and one that is very real consequences now and for the future. we need to work together on effective and sustainable strategies t
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 6:00pm EDT
-- berkeley where he attended law school. he was, i'm sad to report, not much of a student, but he was a joiner of fraternities and maker of friends. and it was there at berkeley that he came of age just as california bulldozed its way into a new kind of politics in state history. the political movement that warren was witness to was, importantly from the his perspective, led by a trial lawyer. even as a somewhat shy young boy, warren had dreamed of practicing law in a courtroom, and as a college student he had the opportunity to watch up close one of the most arresting trial lawyers of his generation. hiram johnson, of whom i'm speaking, was a young lawyer in san francisco who was could upon to take over a corruption case against the city's mayor and some co-conspirators in a bribery scandal. he took over the case, he was second chair of the case at the outset but took over the first chair when the lead prosecutor was shot in the head in court by a dismissed juror. law students, take note. [laughter] it -- johnson made his name in that case and went on to serve as governor of cali
CSPAN
Oct 5, 2012 9:00am EDT
by south chinese emperor who had never heard of law of the seas because that concept didn't exist many years ago. so the issue of the islands, and there are hundreds of islands, requires in my view first of all separating the notion of freedom of the seas from the issue of sovereignty over the islands. but my colleagues here will be held to give much fuller explanation of the issue. what i want to say is that both sides have to make up their mind that they are trying to do something that is historically unprecedented. and in a way competing countries recognize that the international system requires a victory of cooperation between, if they are not going to drift into a confrontation which will then split every other country to participate in. each side will be able to list the mistakes that the other side has made, and of course, but the one favorable thing you can say about this challenge is the most nonpartisan foreign policy in america today is the american administration since 1971 have pursued a centrally, the same course. now, two locations, two president tried to reinvent t
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 12:00pm EDT
vacancies, and we might address that gap. [laughter] there are six products of harvard law school and three products of yale law school on the supreme court. there are apparently no other law schools in the united states. [laughter] besides those two. no, it is a bizarre and unfortunately fact, i think. but those are, i hope, interesting facts about the supreme court. but frankly, i don't think they're very important. here's an important fact. about the supreme court. there are five republicans and four democrats. i will speak for somewhat longer, but this is basically all you need to know. [laughter] if be there's a takeaway here, i have gotten to the point early. there are five republicans and four democrats, and that really tells you much of what you need to know. and it is true that the justices wear robes because they're supposed to look all alike, and they're supposed to look, you know, it's supposed to give the perception that they're all pretty much the same, but just as on the other side of first street the united states congress is deeply divided according to party, so is th
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 5:00pm EDT
he hit the silver screen. but the character in the " conspirator" is much law-abiding and much more manipulative and vicious than the joseph holt i know and underhanded. i think one of the things that the film tries to suggest is the federal government largely in the person of edwin stanton and the person of joseph holt basically railroaded poor mary to her death, and without any interest in what the truth was. they determined that she how would hang regardless and they went after her poor mary. and this just isn't the way the assassination trial played out. there was no deal between stanton and holt to make sure that she was convicted an son. it makes him out to a truly vengeful, two-dimensional character and doesn't reflect who he is as i know him. >> during the administration must have been a difficult job. could you sort of expand upon what that job was maybe before the war and the job that he ended up in? >> well, the job the before the war was basically there was one person who had a small office who kept track of whatever sorts of military sense occurred in an army that was 1
CSPAN
Oct 2, 2012 8:00pm EDT
we call the current law baseline, and cbo analyzes that. cbo talked about how going over the fiscal cliff at the end of this year would bring us back -- likely bring us back into recession, but they also talked about how the fiscal cliff later in the ten year window would cause higher economic growth. i think that's very important to hold on to because we have been in the habit of kicking the fiscal can down the road. they all happen to land in front of us, and i'm here today to say we shouldn't just kick the can down the road again. we shouldn't even try to substitute the fiscal can with the grand bargain like simpson-bowles simply because it is too hard for us. i know we can't do that. i'm proposing instead of, and i'm proposing, not congress, i'm proposing that instead of substituting the fiscal cliff or ignoring it, that we recycle those fiscal cans. we can't kick it, but we have to recycle it. there's the notion, all the fiscal cans representing certain policies that we were willing to commit to in the past that legislators past, committing to the tax bush cuts expiring at the
CSPAN
Oct 4, 2012 6:00am EDT
it's always evolving. let's assume a new set of laws is past. as quickly as they are passed election was figure out how to get around them. it's remarkably to campaign finance is a constant evolving issue. i think there's got to be mechanism, i work for to, million of politicians and my life. i believe there should be a mechanism for rank-and-file people should you be opposing some who so funny tempers a millionaire to be able to raise large amounts. i believe putting the money back have more accountability for the electorate and a much more integrity driven process an issue you're dreading to frame an election. sunday personally just. that's my from make money off these campaigns? absolutely. but from my perspective i think it's better for the country if we go back to that model. >> i don't know if i would necessary agree with that. look at what, i don't know if you saw the american crossroads add what super pacs actually to end with advertising does. a lot of people in here, remember the question in political science 101, should be elected representative do what he believes is righ
CSPAN
Oct 4, 2012 12:00pm EDT
commerce, of a just international order that upholds the rule of law, of open access to all domains, and of the peaceful resolution of disputes. we seek a peaceful asia-pacific region where all the states of the region, all of them, can enjoy the benefits of security and continue to prosper just as they have for almost 70 years, since the valiant efforts of the brave men and women who fought so courageously in world war ii. indeed, part of the reason states in the region have been able to prosper has been due to our military presence. thanks to that historic security, states in the region have had the freedom to choose and forge their own economic and political futures. the stability provided an important measure by the united states military presence in the region helped, first, japan and south korea to rise and prosper, then southeast asia to rise and prosper, and now, yes, china and in a different way, india, to rise and prosper. working with all of them, we intend to continue to play that positive, pivotal stabilizing role. that's what the rebalance is all about. to those who as
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 8:30am EDT
than as the law holds right now, men and women in comparable jobs in the same job. so what they're trying to do is have equal pay for equal work, not equal pay for equal work, which is two very different things. there's no reason why groups of women and groups of men in the same firm should be paid the same if they have radically different jobs. look at exxon, for example, that is a group of men and oil drilling activities. it's a dirty dangerous job. you could not get me to do. you have to pay people a lot to risked their lives doing that kind of work. exxon has a group of women in communications, assistant jobs, publications. there's no reason these two groups should be necessarily paid the same. but the paycheck benefit would be moving toward requiring firms to pay men and women the same, even if they're in very different jobs. that is not paycheck fairness. that's communism. >> diana furchtgott-roth, your book, women's figures, was there a time when women were treated unfairly in the work place? >> there certainly was. there were times in the 1950s and 1960s, you can look at th
CSPAN
Oct 5, 2012 6:00am EDT
issue that we need a regulatory agency to address. it's an issue that's already the law. so my question to you, what is american legion's position -- deeply that our soldiers that are putting their lives on the line each and every day for us, should they be wearing clothing made in the united states of america? >> the answer is yes. the american legion believes that -- [applause] >> i'm should the american legion and american people believe that all of the equipment should be made in the united states of america. and there you go again, talking about jobs. put americans to work making these boots. that will provide jobs here at home. star i want to thank you very much, national commander. and just for the record, i know congressman duncan hunter who is a republican colleague from california, he and i are writing a letter to encourage your colleagues to sign that letter, to the administration requiring them to comply with the intent of the law. and it's unfortunate we have to do that, and hopefully we will see some changes in that regard. take you very much. i yield back. [appla
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 7:00am EDT
remember the three laws of dynamics. so yeah, i take your point but my point is less would've the undergraduate, i don't know we can argue but how important that is, but more, i take your point about the commercialization and the browsers and all that was definitely private, occasional borrowing for more basic research, but my point was that seems like a really critical element was sort of just was the critical mass of people out there, and the guys who founded google were guys who were getting their ph.d's at stanford, you know, and they developed an algorithm out of their training. and just the fact that she did have people working on systems engineering, and it's less the undergraduate but more the government finance, dod research, networking capabilities and all that. look, it's sort of unprovable but there is a story that the critical mass that few -- field itself is built up out there and if you want an explanation for why it happened here and so little happen if their. >> guest: one thing i would say is this. in leading up to 2000 women got to the peak of the internet valua
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 8:45am EDT
. clarence darrow is famous for his speeches. how was he at the nuts and bolts of law, the procedures and corporate procedures. >> she was very good at picking juries. he was a great judge of human nature. he was very good at cross-examination, but he was awful at the technical part of the law, and he would pick up in his famous case, arthur garfield hayes was the attorney for the american civil liberties union. the judge would say, all right. we're going to have an argument on that point of law. parents to you want to come back into my office. leyritz was sick, no, let arthur and of that. i don't do that. earlier in his career, i don't know how many of you had to read but the author was an attorney. he became the legal partner. most of the legal brief writing, when they had to go into the appeals court was done by masters. there is a whole chapter about their very famous falling got and the incredible spite they had for each other for the rest of their lives. they were both very greedy, womanizers, and both convinced that they were literary men thrown into the wrong profession and wh
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 7:45am EDT
cannot relate to some of the obstacles that she face. more women than men are in law school and medical school now. and so, when elizabeth dole would describe how she was one of 24 women at harvard law school, is really an older notion at this point. if you get distances her from the younger audience is. so i don't think it's a good idea for modern women candidate to keep describing the obstacles they face and how unique they are because we tend to resist voting for someone who was the first of anything because it seems scary and probably not a good idea because it's never done it before. so i think taking attention away from that is better. >> and not labeling issues as women's issues are feminist issues. i think all the women in the book really didn't run as women. there's a book called running as a woman. but when pat schroeder ran the first time for congress on colorado, someone asked her to come her to come into play and is running as a woman? her question was, do i have another option? [laughter] it is obvious this is a woman. it's obviously never had a woman president. so
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